From Charlottesville to Boston: When Hate is Misrepresented as Righteousness (A KJ Sunday Morning Reflection)

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This week, I have been dissecting the renewed push by American Liberals, through the violence of the Antifa and the erroneous reporting of the Main Stream Media and their misinformed political pundits, to take away all historical artifacts which would remind the public of the Confederacy, from public view.

This being Sunday, I have decided to look at a different angle of this story.

In June of 2016, CNN.com reported that

Leaders at the Washington National Cathedral have voted unanimously to remove Confederate battle flags from stained-glass windows memorializing Confederate generals Robert E. Lee and Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson.

The symbols will be replaced with panes of plain glass, the National Cathedral said in a statement issued Wednesday.
The development comes as the church plans forums on racism, slavery and racial reconciliation. The long-term future of the Lee and Jackson windows will be discussed.
 
The Confederate battle flag was featured prominently in pictures posted by Dylann Roof.
Roof has been charged with killing nine people at a Bible study in Charleston, South Carolina, on June 17, 2015. He confessed in interviews with Charleston police and the FBI, two law enforcement officials told CNN. He also told investigators he wanted to start a race war, one of those officials said.
The incident sparked a national debate about whether state and private institutions in the South and beyond should feature the Confederate flag, which many see as a symbol of racial oppression.
The National Cathedral is owned by the Episcopal Diocese of Washington, but is often used for national prayer services and the funerals of top Washington officials, including former President Gerald Ford.
In the statement, cathedral leaders said no date is set for the removal of the Confederate symbols.
The Rev. Dr. Kelly Brown Douglas, the cathedral’s canon theologian, said the change will provide “an opportunity for us to begin to write a new narrative on race and racial justice at the Cathedral and perhaps for our nation.”
The windows will remain in place for the duration of future public discussions, the cathedral said. The first session is set for July 17.
The windows were installed in 1953 at the request of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and are two of many stained-glass bays on the cathedral’s main level.
The two windows were put in place to honor “the lives and legacies of Confederate Generals Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee,” according to the Very Rev. Gary Hall, former dean of the National Cathedral.
Hall last year said the National Cathedral had installed these windows to “foster reconciliation” between the North and the South. But they did more than simply seek to repair a divided nation, he said.
They sought to “reframe the Civil War and present these two generals as saintly, exemplary Christians” when these two men were in fact ardent supporters of Hall called an “unjust cause … the sin of slavery.”
“We can live with some contradictions until we can’t,” Hall said.
Make no mistake about it. This was a purely political move.
The National Cathedral, since falling under the control of those who worship at the altar of  Modern American Liberalism and Political Correctness, has become an extension of the Political Policies of the Democratic Party.
The was no reframing done, when those images were added at the National Cathedral.
General Robert E. Lee and General Stonewall Jackson were Christian Americans.
In a review of the book, “Robert E. Lee: The Christian”, Tim Challies, blogger, author, and book reviewer, wrote the following on his website, http://www.challies.com:
In writing Robert E. Lee: The Christian, William J. Johnson sifted through hundreds of letters written to and from Lee as well as accounts written of him, seeking to find evidence of this Civil War general’s faith. Having found ample evidence, the author concludes that Lee’s correspondance “reveals him as a man who lived in the presence of God; who looked to God continually for guidance and strength; whose mind and heart were saturated with faith and trust in God.” The nearly 300 pages of this book are dedicated to showing example after example of Lee’s obvious love for and trust in his Creator.

This book is not a biography. Rather, it is a collection of hundreds of quotes taken from Lee’s letters, mostly those written to his family, but also ones he wrote to his superiors, subordinates and friends. Lee’s words outnumber the author’s by a large margin, likely four to one or even higher. Johnson provides hundreds of examples of Lee’s trust in God, his Christian character and his love for the Lord. He was a true spiritual giant, one of many to emerge from the Civil War (I think also of Abraham Lincoln, Stonewall Jackson, and others).

A little dry, but well worth reading for Civil War enthusiasts, this book proves that Robert E. Lee should be an inspiration for all believers.

According to a review of a biography of General Stonewall Jackson, “Onward Christian Solider”, found in The New York Times,
Stonewall Jackson would fight in 16 Civil War engagements, and his nickname dates from the first one, at Manassas, where troops were rallied by the cry ”Look, men, there is Jackson standing like a stone wall!” By the time of the last one, Mr. Robertson writes, ”his fame flashed across his own Southern Confederacy, soared over the land of his enemies and traveled even beyond the seas.” To explain this meteoric rise, he takes as his text the prediction of one of Jackson’s wartime aides, James Power Smith: ”The religion of Stonewall Jackson will be the chief and most effective way into the secret spring of the character and career of this strong man.”Jackson was fanatical in his Presbyterian faith, and it energized his military thought and character. Theology was the only subject he genuinely enjoyed discussing. His dispatches invariably credited an ever-kind Providence. Assigning his fate to God’s hands, he acted utterly fearlessly on the battlefield — and expected the same of everyone else in Confederate gray. Jackson’s God smiled south, blessing him with the strength of Joshua to smite the Amalekites without mercy. Previous biographers have ignored or soft-pedaled this mercilessness in war, but Mr. Robertson underlines it as a source of Jackson’s fierce battlefield leadership.

This fanatical religiosity had drawbacks. It warped Jackson’s judgment of men, leading to poor appointments; it was said he preferred good Presbyterians to good soldiers. It branded him holier-than-thou, with an intolerance for others’ frailties, and this spilled over onto the battlefield to generate truly senseless confrontations with his lieutenants. One such, with General Hill, led Hill to rage at ”that crazy old Presbyterian fool” and seek to escape from Jackson’s command. Another lieutenant, reading in a Jackson dispatch that ”God blessed our arms with victory,” remarked irreverently, ”I suppose it is true, but we would have had no victory if we hadn’t fought like the devil!”

So, these men, whom Liberals have vilified all this past week, were Christian men.

But what about the members of the Antifa, whom they have placed upon a pedestal as “Social Justice Warriors” fighting bravely against “White Supremacists”?

Not so much.

According to The Washington Examiner

Among the eclectic throng of demonstrators in Boston on Saturday, a supporter of President Trump found himself surrounded by protesters who yelled profanities at him.

A man wearing an Israeli flag as a cape can be seen in a video shared by Univision’s Jessica Weiss, walking through a crowd of protesters. One person rips off his “Make America Great Again” and throws it away.

Amid the obscenaties directed at him, one protester shouted, “Get the f@#k out of our f@#king town.” Another person can be heard urging the other protesters not to be violent.

Weiss asked why he was in Boston to demonstrate, and the man replied, “I want to show that people shouldn’t be afraid to voice their other views and voice their opinions.”

“You shouldn’t be afraid to go outside and say you’re conservative,” he added “And it’s pretty sad that things like this happen.”

Thousands of protesters descended on Boston on Saturday, including a “free speech” rally organized by some right-leaning groups. These groups were reportedly far outnumbered by groups of counter-protesters.

All told, law enforcement officials estimated between 30,000 and 40,000 demonstrators.

Boston Police commissioner William Evans praised the vast majority of those involed, saying that “99.9 percent of the people here were here for the right reason, and that is to fight bigotry and hate.”

Meanwhile, President Trump praised law enforcement, while tweeting his ire directed at “anti-police agitators.” He later tweeted, “I want to applaud the many protestors in Boston who are speaking out against bigotry and hate. Our country will soon come together as one!”

Boston police said they arrested 33 people on Saturday.

The Boston demonstrations come a week after the violent protest in Charlottesville, Va., which began when white supremacy and neo-Nazi groups protested the removal of Confederate general Robert E. Lee statue. They were confronted by counter-protesters, and amid chaos a car plowed into a group of counter-protesters killing one woman and injuring 19 others.

Earlier in the week, Christian Clergy and Laymen and women alike took to Social Media imploring Americans to “Stand up against all this Hate and Violence”.

And, that’s great. God’s Word tells us to “fight the good fight”.

However, when Christ was sending out his disciples, he advised them to

… be wise as serpents and innocent as doves. – Matthew 10:16

My point being, that the Klan and the Former Occupy Wall Street Operative, known as Jason Kessler, who may just be “posing” as a “White Supremicist” are as morally reprehensible as they come.

However, for the Main Stream Media, Democratic Party, and Modern American Liberals to assign righteousness to the thugs of Antifa is to equate the Manson Family to the Tanner Family of “Full House” Fame.

Pay attention to whom the real enemies of our Traditional American Faith and Value System are.

And, pray diligently and conduct yourself accordingly.

Until He Comes,

KJ

 

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